Lysol, Hairdressers, and a National Spelling Bee

A roundup of stories we’re reading about Covid-19 today

Yasmin Tayag
Medium Coronavirus Blog
2 min readApr 24, 2020

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  • In response to President Donald Trump’s dangerous comments about injecting disinfectants to cure Covid-19, a spokesperson representing Lysol warned: “Under no circumstance should our disinfectant products be administered into the human body,” reports The Guardian.
  • After New York and New Jersey, the area with the highest Covid-19 infection rate is the Navajo Nation, which desperately lacks the resources to keep the disease under control due to lack of government funding. Now, reports NPR, Navajo Nation is suing the federal government for its share of Covid-19 funding.
  • Among the businesses reopening in Georgia today — despite the state’s failure to meet government criteria for doing so — are hair salons. But as The New Yorker reports, Georgia’s hair care experts are hesitating: Official guidance suggests changing smocks and sanitizing after each client, taking each client’s temperature, and staying far apart. It’s “the craziest thing,” said one hairdresser. “Social distancing while giving a haircut is hard.”
  • At The Atlantic, writer Tom Vanderbilt invites readers to reflect on the newly empty streets and consider which changes we’d like to make permanent. Already in Oakland and Berlin, officials are rezoning certain areas as public spaces, and Milan is creating wider sidewalks and temporary cycling lanes on 22 miles of city streets.
  • In lieu of the canceled Scripps National Spelling Bee at the end of May, an online contest organized by two former contestants, a brother and sister, will take place on Zoom, the New York Times reports. People spend years preparing to compete; to “not have the opportunity to show off their skills in their last year of eligibility is heartbreaking.”
  • In Wired, writer Christie Aschwanden argues that everyone should stop getting so excited about preliminary findings since they can turn out to be wrong or more nuanced than initially reported. “It’s vital that we gather knowledge as quickly as we can in the face of the pandemic — but sacrificing scientific standards won’t do anything to accelerate that process,” she writes. “If anything, it will slow it down.”

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Yasmin Tayag
Medium Coronavirus Blog

Editor, Medium Coronavirus Blog. Senior editor at Future Human by OneZero. Previously: science at Inverse, genetics at NYU.