“I couldn’t control myself… I was just thinking ‘I’m losing my mind.’”

Documentary photographer Ivan Agerton started experiencing psychotic symptoms in mid-December, after a mild case of Covid-19. He had trouble sleeping, bouts of paranoia, and auditory hallucinations, the New York Times reports. Agerton shared his story to raise awareness about the condition, which is rare but has affected people around the world who have no history of mental illness.

Experts hypothesize that psychosis is a brain-related effect of Covid-19 that may result from the immune response, vascular issues, or surges of disease-related inflammation. Still, as the Times notes, “Much about the condition remains mysterious.”

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